Wild Alaska Salmon Season Kicks Off May 16 | Food Newsfeed
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Wild Alaska Salmon Season Kicks Off May 16

May 10, 2016 Industry News
Industry News

The highly anticipated harvest for the five species of wild Alaska salmon kicks off on May 16 with the first of the season sockeyes and kings making their way onto menus across restaurants nationwide. The harvest season for pink, keta, and coho salmon will follow in late May and continue through October meaning flavorful wild Alaska salmon will be available all summer long. One of the most popular fish in the country, more than 90 percent of the wild salmon harvested in the U.S. comes from the pristine, icy waters of Alaska resulting in unparalleled flavor, exceptional quality, and fishermen following some of the best sustainable fishing practices in the world.

From the rich, robust flavor of sockeye to the delicate flavor of coho, the five unique species of wild Alaska salmon offer an array of flavorful options for a variety of recipes and cooking techniques. Wild Alaska salmon can be enjoyed fresh during summer, and frozen and canned year-round. Plus, with the 2015 Dietary Guidelines recommending at least 8 ounces of seafood per week, consumers look for wild Alaska salmon on menus as a healthful, excellent source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids.

With 161 million salmon forecast, this season is the perfect time for restaurants to offer customers unique recipes that spotlight all five species including: 

  • Sockeye—Alaska Salmon Sliders with Rosemary Lemon Aioli and Pickled Onions 
  • King—Korean Soybean Cured Wild Alaska King Salmon
  • Pink—Alaska Salmon Hushpuppies 
  • Keta—Grilled Alaska Salmon with Avocado and Papaya Spinach Salad 
  • Coho—Alaska Salmon Marsala

For more foodservice recipe ideas, including the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute’s SWAP Meat collection that puts a healthy twist on classic recipes, and information on Alaska’s wide array of whitefish and shellfish varieties, visit www.wildalaskaseafood.com 

News and information presented in this release has not been corroborated by FSR, Food News Media, or Journalistic, Inc.