March 2019 | Food Newsfeed
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March 2019

Bar Professionals Say Bring on the Banana

The beverage world will see a reemergence in banana flavors, predicts Eric Nakata, vice president of beverage innovation S&D Coffee & Tea. This renewed enthusiasm for banana may be related to growing interest in Latin American cuisine, which uses the banana-like plantain as a staple, or the trend toward plant-based and natural ingredients for elements like non-dairy milk alternatives (up 61 percent over the past 5 years, according to The Next Idea 2019 Restaurant and Food Forecast) that can be made from bananas.

Why AI Can Be a Traditional Restaurant’s Secret Sauce

As everyone in the restaurant business knows, the competition for guest dollars is intense. For traditional restaurants, the competitive landscape is complicated by the rise of on-demand formats like ghost restaurants, pop-up dining options and food trucks—a sector that is forecast to grow like wildfire over the next dozen years, from $35 billion to a whopping $365 billion.

What’s Up with Airport Units?

One hundred million. That’s how many passengers, on average, travel through Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport each year. Granted, it is the busiest airport in the world, but this figure provides just a small glimpse into the captive audience brands can reach by opening an airport outpost for their restaurants.

What Millennials Want on the Wine List

The nation’s largest wine-consuming class is also among its youngest. According to Wines Vines Analytics, wine sales were near $46.5 billion in 2018, and millennials are drinking much of it. In fact, 40 percent more millennials than the overall adult population drink regularly throughout the year, according to stats on consumer wine consumption by the Wine Market Council released in 2016.

How Italian Restaurants Can Accommodate Food Allergies

Once every three minutes, a food allergy sends someone to the emergency room, according to Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE). The Centers for Disease Control & Prevention reports that eight foods or food groups account for 90 percent of serious allergic reactions in the United States: milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, wheat, soy, peanuts, and tree nuts.