Import Wine Takes Share from Domestics

Nov 26, 2013 Industry News
Industry News

While Domestic Wine volumes in restaurants & bars in the United States outnumber Imports by about 2:1, Imports have been steadily taking share from Domestics throughout 2013 on the strength of wines imported from Italy, Argentina, and New Zealand:

  •  While Domestics account for 65.3 percent of wine volumes in on-premise in the U.S., Imports have gained 0.7 points of share through early November 2013 compared to the prior year.
  •  However, in looking at the largest 14 countries and U.S. regions in terms of wine sold in restaurants and bars in the United States: the largest year-over-year gains in volume share have been achieved by Italy (+0.8 points compared to the prior year), Argentina (+0.5 points), and New Zealand (+0.2 points), while at the other end of the spectrum, the largest year over year share losses have been experienced by Australia (-0.5 points), the California region of the United States (-0.4 points), Chile (-0.2 points), and the Oregon/Washington region of the United States (-0.2 points).
  • One of the key determinants of the relative-performance of the various regions of the world relates to their relative exposure to the stronger/weaker varietals selling in on-premise in 2013. The largest year-over-year gains in volume share have been achieved by Malbec and Moscato each at +0.3 points gained vs. the prior year, and Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Grigio, and Sparkling/Champagne each gained +0.2 points of share. At the other end of the spectrum, the largest year over year share loss has been experienced by Merlot at -0.45 points, Chardonnay at -0.4 points, and Shiraz at -0.2 points.
  • Looking at the story in more detail, Italy’s share gain has come primarily from strong growth in its Sparkling Wines and Prosecco, Red Blends, and Chianti. Argentina’s share gains came primarily through its growth in Malbec, and to a lesser extent, Cabernet Sauvignon. New Zealand’s share gain was due to its strong growth in Sauvignon Blanc. At the other end of the spectrum, Australia’s share loss was largely attributable to contracting sales in Shiraz, and California’s share loss came from softening sales in Chardonnay and Merlot (though this was partially offset by healthy growth in California Pinot Noir).

 

 

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