October 2016 | Food Newsfeed
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October 2016

Fall Doesn’t Have to Mean Pumpkin

Fall means the arrival of pumpkin, but some chefs are turning away from the overload of the orange vegetable and embracing other seasonal flavors.In Oakland, California, at the newly opened Oaxacan restaurant Agave Uptown, a fall lineup of flavors highlights produce that Chef Octavio Diaz receives directly from Oaxaca, Mexico, and his local farm in Healdsburg, California.

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Jessica Arden

Falling for Ciders

The crisp autumn air. The earth-tone foliage. And the season’s most popular fruit. With the apple harvest comes a season for putting the resurgence in American cider-making front and center on any table, and a handful of restaurants or cider-centric public houses are at the forefront of this movement.

Journee: A Club for Networking and Learning

After ascending to general manager of Chef Thomas Keller’s acclaimed New York City restaurant Per Se in 2009, former maître d’ Anthony Rudolf was learning on the job. “I knew how to run the dining room and I knew how to run service, but from a financial standpoint I did not know how to run the business,” recalls Rudolf, who felt fortunate to have a support system that allowed him to learn.

Rebranding Reinvigorates Cheddar’s Casual Café

When Aubrey Good and Doug Rogers opened the first Cheddar’s Casual Café in 1979, they never considered serving guests anything but scratch-made meals. For the past 37 years, the brand has prioritized preparing dishes the “right way,” versus the “easy way.

Lessons In Leftovers

In June, five of the top Bay Area chefs collaborated on a “Waste Not, Want Not” dinner, held at The Perennial in San Francisco. Organized by the Natural Resources Defense Council (nrdc), the benefit had a two-fold goal: to raise money and to showcase a stellar meal made largely using leftover foods.

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Adam Stewart Photography

Tapping Into the Future of Wine

There are times when Chef John Franke will glance around his restaurant and see a table of four sharing 20 glasses of wine. There might be five, perhaps six appetizers, with more on the way. Does this sound like a concept geared toward millennials or high rollers with bottomless bank accounts?Welcome to the evolving world of wine on tap in the 21st century.

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Christopher Villano / The NOMAD Hotel

NoMad Chefs On How They're Inspiring the Next Generation

The NoMad hotel in the heart of New York City has roughly 100 kitchen employees, including line cooks, 15 sous chefs, and managers at different kitchen levels. The NoMad’s executive chef, James Kent, and chef de cuisine, Brian Lockwood, talk about opportunities to challenge and inspire young chefs in their restaurant settings and in competitions.

Trump International's Sixteen Tells a Culinary Story

The fact Chef Thomas Lents majored in philosophy won’t come as a surprise to anyone who has sampled his cuisine. In the past four years since taking the reins at Sixteen, the Michelin two-star restaurant in Chicago’s Trump International Hotel & Tower, Lents’ menu has displayed a narrative and ingenuity worthy of a master storyteller.

Local Wine Isn't Reserved for California Anymore

The minute Tyler Sailsbery—chef/owner of The Black Sheep in Whitewater, Wisconsin—decided to pour local wines, business partnerships started to happen.Suddenly he was hosting chef dinners six times a year at Staller Estate Winery, one of the wineries whose bottles appear on his list.